Question

 Does Light Always Travel at the Same Speed?

Answer The speed of light in a vacuum is 299,792,458 meters per second or 670,615,343 miles per hour. This is represented by the variable c, which stands for the Latin celeritas, which means speed. Ther... Read More »
http://www.wisegeek.com/does-light-always-travel-at-the-same-speed.htm


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Top Q&A For: Does Light Always Travel at the Same Speed

Does light have mass If so, then how can it travel at the speed of light Doesn't the mass of an object (particle) approach infinity as its velocity approaches the speed of light?

Light has precisely zero mass and that makes all the difference. You're right that taking a massive particle up to the speed of light is impossible because doing so would, in a certain sense, give ... Read More »
http://www.howeverythingworks.org/page1.php?QNum=524

I think that the speed of light could be broken by turning a very long lever. If the lever is long enough and you have enough power to turn it, the end of the lever will travel faster than the speed of light. Is this so — NL, Hong Kong?

I'm afraid that this technique won't work—the torque you would have to exert on the lever to make its end approach the speed of light would become infinite and the energy you would have to transf... Read More »
http://www.howeverythingworks.org/page1.php?QNum=1218

I understand that the speed of electricity varies with the conductor, but is supposedly 2/3 the speed of light. I had thought the speed would equal the speed of light. Why isn't it — AP?

Although electricity involves the movement of electrically charged particles through conducting materials, it can also be viewed in terms of electromagnetic waves. For example, programs that reach ... Read More »
http://www.howeverythingworks.org/page1.php?QNum=1267

Is the red light effect in xerographic copiers the same concept behind red lights in a darkroom Does film have the same sort of properties?

Yes. The light sensitive particles in black-and-white photographic paper don't respond to red light because the energy in a photon of red light doesn't have enough energy to cause the required chem... Read More »
http://www.howeverythingworks.org/page1.php?QNum=1357


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