Question

 How does one find out the speed of a quark Is it 7000 times the speed of light — D?

Answer It seems that quarks are forever trapped inside the particles they comprise—no one has ever seen an isolated quark. But inside one of those particles, the quarks move at tremendous speeds. Their ... Read More »
http://www.howeverythingworks.org/page1.php?QNum=1265


Related Videos

Top Q&A For: How does one find out the speed of a quark Is i...

I understand that the speed of electricity varies with the conductor, but is supposedly 2/3 the speed of light. I had thought the speed would equal the speed of light. Why isn't it — AP?

Although electricity involves the movement of electrically charged particles through conducting materials, it can also be viewed in terms of electromagnetic waves. For example, programs that reach ... Read More »
http://www.howeverythingworks.org/page1.php?QNum=1267

I am intrigued by your assertion that the speed of light is the fastest speed in the universe. It seems to me that we wouldn't be able to determine the fastest speed achievable in the universe, just as we can't find the final number in math. When we'?

Your comparison between the limitless counting numbers and the limited speeds in the universe is an interesting one because it points out a fundamental difference between the older Galilean/Newtoni... Read More »
http://www.howeverythingworks.org/page1.php?QNum=1398

If you were at the back of a bus going the speed of light, and you were to run toward the front, would you be moving faster than the speed of light or turn into energy — TM, Ft. Bragg, NC?

First, your bus can't be going at the speed of light because massive objects are strictly forbidden from traveling at that speed. Even to being traveling near the speed of light would require a fan... Read More »
http://www.howeverythingworks.org/page1.php?QNum=1423

Does light have mass If so, then how can it travel at the speed of light Doesn't the mass of an object (particle) approach infinity as its velocity approaches the speed of light?

Light has precisely zero mass and that makes all the difference. You're right that taking a massive particle up to the speed of light is impossible because doing so would, in a certain sense, give ... Read More »
http://www.howeverythingworks.org/page1.php?QNum=524


feedback
loading