Question

 Why Does the Same Side of the Moon Always Face the Earth?

Answer The same side of the Moon always faces the Earth. The "dark side" is not actually dark — it gets cycles of day and night just like most places on Earth — the "far side" is a more correct term... Read More »
http://www.wisegeek.com/why-does-the-same-side-of-the-moon-always-face-the-earth.htm


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Top Q&A For: Why Does the Same Side of the Moon Always Face ...

In one of your answers, you said that the "water on the earth's surface swells up into two bulges: one on the side of the earth nearest the moon and one on the side farthest from the moon." Can you explain why the water bulges up on the side farthest?

To understand the two bulges, imagine three objects: the earth, a ball of water on the side of the earth nearest the moon, and a ball of water on the side of the earth farthest from the moon. Now p... Read More »
http://www.howeverythingworks.org/page1.php?QNum=1393

In the evening I see the sun and moon at the same time, does that mean the other side of the world has neither?

no- if you think, they aren't in the same place, so.... imagine a clock face. the sun and moon can be seen by half the world at the same time, right? so on the clock the sun or moon can be seen ove... Read More »
http://uk.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090109092245AAhJnoN

Your answer to question #1393 is fine for the hypothetical case of the earth orbiting around the moon, but I don't see how it works for the real case where the moon orbits the earth. What is the real reason for the tides — DM?

There is nothing hypothetical about the earth orbiting the moon; it's as real as the moon orbiting the earth. The earth and the moon are simply two huge balls in otherwise empty space and though th... Read More »
http://www.howeverythingworks.org/page1.php?QNum=1526

How Does the Earth Sun Moon Work Together?

The moon orbits around the earth and the earth around the sun around its own orbit. The three objects work together, to bring about high and low tides, by means of gravitational force.


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